Now I lay me down to sleep...

on Sunday, April 1, 2007 at 11:25 AM

So this is what my HR looks like while I sleep. I had no idea why my HR was spiking throughout the night. I didn't have any nightmares or anything so I was beginning to wonder if it may be a problem with my heart. I surfed around this morning and found someone else that also posted a chart of his HR while sleeping (see I'm not crazy. you can find ANYTHING on the internet) and he had the same HR spikes. So it's good to know I'm not alone. My average for the whole night was 48 bpm. The parts where there were no spikes were either 45 or 46 so I'll assume that my resting HR is about 45 bpm. I think I'll do this again sometime, cause it'll be interesting to see if things change.

One interesting thing I noticed for the amateur meteorologist in you is that if you notice the altitude graph, it appears that I was climbing in my sleep. My watch calculates altitude based on air pressure which means that the air pressure was steadily decreasing over night (higher you go, the lower the air pressure gets). A steady decrease in air pressure means rain is on the way and what do you know, it's currently ... raining.

My training plan has 15 miles @ 20 s slower than marathon pace (about 8 min/mile). I had wanted to do it this morning except that it was raining. It's supposed to clear up for a few hours late afternoon, so I'll do it then.

Thanks for reading.

4 comments:

Audrey said...

hmmmm....interesting....i wonder if when people talk about resting heart rates on the internet and at doctor's offices and anywhere really they are using REAL, TRUE resting heart rate data from at night or just the resting heart rates from the day...

Steve said...

Just curious? What made you want to trend your heart rate at night? What is your average HR during the day?

Have you considered going to a real sleep lab?

I would be kind of leary about the data that those sports monitors put out.

Fran said...

Steve,
I was just curious to know what my resting hr is. It's useful for measuring heart rate reserve which becomes useful for HR training since I can get the proper training zones.

Perry said...

Good to see that you're back to running.

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